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Road repair works are now under way across North Devon

By North Devon Journal  |  Posted: July 11, 2013

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ESSENTIAL road repairs are finally getting under way in North Devon despite Devon County Council facing a £687 million repair bill.

Work is now under way to repair many of North Devon's worst roads after a harsh winter with extreme conditions, which is estimated to have caused a further £12.2 million worth of damage.

North Devon Roads are high on the agenda for the council, with roads in Bideford, Braunton, Rackenford, Umberleigh, Ilfracombe, Bishops Nympton and Holsworthy all due for repair by the end of the summer.

The surface dressing programme, which is now half-way through, will see the road surface restored and sealed to prevent water damage and skidding, and extend the life of the road by up to 10 years.

Road surface repairs are going to be taking place across North Devon until September 2. Some of the roads due for repair are Burrows Close Lane in Braunton, Mount Pleasant in Bideford, the B3233 at Yelland and Shirwell Cross at Muddiford.

Councillor Stuart Hughes, cabinet member for highways, said road redressing is the most cost effective way to repair roads.

"It is in everyone's long term interest to prevent our highway network from deteriorating to a point where more costly treatments are needed, which is why a 'worst first' approach to repairing our roads is less cost effective.

"For all roads, including those we cannot afford to fully restore, safety remains a priority and that is why we have a separate reactive maintenance process for dealing with potholes and defects."

The extensive programme comes after it was reported that the council was facing a huge backlog of repair bills of £687 million for the 8,000 miles of road the council covers, which is the largest of any council in the country.

The council has recently pledged its support to a campaign set up by the Local Government Authority to urge the Government to provide greater funding for future road repairs.

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  • davearichards  |  July 11 2013, 8:50PM

    How can DCC say that this dangerous method of road repair extends the life of the road surface for up to 10 years? Look at the story in the Journal about the road in Bickington which it is said has been surfaced dressed twice in a matter of weeks and is still not fit for purpose. Also does anyone remember the surfacing work carried out at the bottom of Fore Street in Ilfracombe? This surface started to peel off after a very short time so DCC, North Devon Council and Ilfracombe Town Council decided to dig the road up and brick pave it. This was reported in the North Devon Journal on the 13th September 2012. Who paid for this? We are told that DCC contributed £59,000, NDC and Ilfracombe council shared the rest of the cost which was £51,000, total cost £110,000, but we all know this means the council tax payers actually had to foot the bill. On the road between Blackmoor Gate and Parracombe near the first turning to Parracombe the edge of the road is subsiding so why have DCC carried out surface dressing along this stretch of road before repairing it? This type of road surface is extremely dangerous for cyclists and motor cyclists as well as causing untold damage to the paintwork on a lot of cars. Half the chippings used to surface dress a road are swept up a week or two later and these are then being dumped at farms and lay-bys all over Devon because they cannot be reused due to contamination. It's about time DCC stopped wasting our money on this cheap short term fix and did the job properly. I urge everyone who suffers damage to their vehicle or injury to themselves which can be attributed to this shoddy work to find a "no win no fee" solicitor and sue Devon County Council for as much as they can. This is the only way we will stop this dangerous and shoddy repair work from carrying on.

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